Twitter CFO On Its Marketing Strategy; LinkedIn's Publishing Plans

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Noto Speaks

Ad Age tapped Twitter CFO Anthony Noto for an update on the firm’s marketing strategy and the search for a new CMO. “We have the best aggregated real-time content in the world,” Noto said. “The value of Twitter is that we give people both the opportunity to find out what's happening right now, but also we give them a microphone to project globally what they find of interest and their points of view. And we're trying to encapsulate both of those value propositions into a marketing campaign that brings that message to the masses.” On the CMO front, Noto said Twitter is “moving aggressively” to hire an exec, but wouldn’t give a timeline. Read it.

Not LinkedOut

Is LinkedIn creating a closed publishing ecosystem? If a 44% decline in referral traffic to 1,000 publishers measured by SimpleReach is any indicator, LinkedIn may be prioritizing its own media and contributor network, writes Lucia Moses of Digiday. LinkedIn has ramped up its content efforts for well over a year (read AdExchanger coverage) and rolled out formats like self-serve Sponsored Updates for publishers. With LinkedIn’s investment in the Pulse news app, and subsequent editorial hires, it appears to be angling for more engagement – within its own four walls. More at Digiday.

Programmatic TV Level Up

IDC forecasts worldwide programmatic TV ad spend will hit $17.3 billion by 2019, up from $69 million in 2014. IDC also says programmatic ad spend on linear TV will outpace spend on both streaming video and RTB. “If programmatic TV picks up the way it’s projected, it could be the ideal spot for those frustrated marketers to dump budgets,” writes MediaPost’s Tyler Loechner. Major footnote: The Trade Desk sponsored IDC’s report. Read on.

Difference In Opinion

Privacy concerns are slowing ad targeting in Europe, Ashley Swartz, CEO of TV ad-management platform Furious Corp., tells Beet.TV. “Although programmatic and automation is accelerated more so in Europe than [In the US], adoption of addressability and targeting down to an individual level is much slower to evolve,” she said. One reason: Individual countries have differing opinions on the use of third-party data, whereas the US is homogenized. But Europe is ahead of the US on smart TV and OTT adoption, according to Swartz. More.

Using Users

When concerns in the developer or app publisher community confront user privacy concerns, developers lose. Google doesn’t disagree, according to Re/code’s Mark Bergen, but that hasn’t stopped it from pointing developers toward loopholes in Apple’s new security protocols (which disable mobile ads outside of publishers not running advanced security measures). It serves as an important reminder that, when push comes to shove, Google is an ad business and Apple is not. *An update to Re/code's story notes that Apple had actually previously documented the encryption workarounds, tipping off developers before Google's blog post did the same. Read on.

The Variable Pricing Bogeyman

Companies in international markets are experimenting with tech that adjusts ecommerce prices in real time based on knowledge of consumers. For high-margin items, for instance, a brand can up its profit considerably by giving different price points to different consumer segments. In Europe, which has emerged as the digital world’s regulatory petri dish, a paper from the University of Amsterdam Institute for Information Law examines the legality of that kind of market manipulation – and whether the user knowledge it displays is contrary to data protection standards. More.

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