Snapchat Adds New Photo Storage Feature; Google's Hardware Play Could Be Problematic

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Sticking Around

Snapchat is moving away from being an “ephemeral app” to one that saves and stores. A new feature called Moments will allow users to save old snaps in-app to send to friends or repost in the future, the company announced in a blog post. Previously, users could only save photos to the camera roll before sending or posting. Moments, which users can access by swiping up on the camera app, also includes a passcode-encrypted folder called “My Eyes Only” for private photos. Snapchat is marketing the feature as a way fun way to “celebrate an anniversary or birthday by finding a few old Snaps.” Implications for marketers? Well, they can store their Snapchat assets on-platform now.  

Harder Than It Looks

While Google can certainly do search and ad tech, it’s still figuring out hardware. On the heels of a report that Google is building its own handset in-house (recall that its Nexus used OEMs like HTC, Samsung and LG), Evan Blass at VentureBeat considers the implications. Android is already the most popular operating system in the world, but there are some eye-popping advantages of controlling the entire device from soup to nuts. But there’s no reward without risk. Would or could Google brave the ensuing regulatory hail and retaliation from powerful mobile operators (plus pretty much everyone with any stake in the digital economy)? The EU, which already regards Google suspiciously, in particular might have another freakout.

Marketing Bots

After a stagnant start, Facebook is introducing new features to its chatbot ecosystem. Facebook was bullish on Messenger bots earlier this year, and its dev partners launched 10,000 of them in April. But that number has barely grown to 11,000 bots since May, according to Business Insider. The new Account Linking feature in particular is a win for businesses, as it links their bot threads on Messenger back to specific customer accounts. The update helps marketers initiate a more seamless relationship with customers (and gives Facebook a chance to sink its teeth into buyers’ CRM data). More.

Second Wind

Microsoft’s CRM suite was once an indomitable software force, but now it’s looking up at Salesforce, Oracle and SAP. Microsoft isn’t gonna go down easy, though. Perhaps you heard they dropped $26 billion on LinkedIn? That was after reportedly looking to buy Slack at $8 billion. On Wednesday, Microsoft unveiled a bunch of new products, including an app store, a nascent developer ecosystem and integrations across its cloud products. “The [advantage] of Microsoft’s approach is that it’s not just CRM data, but ERP data and the Office productivity suite unified, enabling users to access just the data and functions they need – be they from inventory, a customer record or e-mail,” says Nucleus Research VP Rebecca Wetteman to TechCrunch’s Ron Miller. More.

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