Retargeter MediaForge Scooped Up By LinkShare; Real-Time Badders

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Display Ad-quisition

Rakuten LinkShare - you know, LinkShare - has acquired Utah-based display ad retargeter MediaForge. Read the release.  The NextWeb points out, “The company, which was simply called LinkShare before it was acquired by Japanese e-commerce and Internet services giant Rakuten for $425 million in cash back in 2005, says the deal will enable mediaFORGE to accelerate its expansion and reach throughout the US, Canada, the UK, and Japan.” Read it. MediaForge’s 50 employees will undoubtedly bring retargeting help to Rakuten LinkShare’s affiliate business kinda like ValueClick is hoping Dotomi can fit with its Commission Junction unit.

Google Everywhere

Google has teamed with market analysts Ipsos and Sterling Brands on a survey that’s intended to quantify the amount of shuffling consumers do with their digital devices. Read the official blog post. TechCrunch’s Ingrid Lunden looks at the implications: “Given that Google will have advertising following users along the way, it also implies Google continuing to make sure that it has a role to play across all of the screens. Whether it does so as a software-only player, or also through an increasing role in the hardware itself, remains to be seen, although products like Google’s new tablet with Asus, and its new ownership of Motorola Mobility, seem to point in the latter direction.” Read more.

FTC Eyes App Data

Marketing mobile apps is becoming a bigger business. The FTC knows this and wants developer tactics to stay above-board. Data privacy is the keyword in a new set of Mobile App Marketing Principles from the agency, with bullet points like “Keep User Data Secure,” “Collect Sensitive Information Only with Consent,” and “Honor Your Privacy Promises.” Download it.

Real-Time Badders?

Rubicon-ers Jordan Mitchell and Neil Richter review the RTB marketplace in a piece on AdMonsters.  The publisher side tech gurus claim to see nefarious buy side strategies.  Here’s one: “A bidding ring is when a group of bidders agree to not compete with each other in the same auction, and this is known to cause seller revenue problems within second price auctions. Single bid responses constrain market growth.” Read more.

The Privacy Exchange

On Evidon’s company blog, Turn SVP of Product Joshua Koran takes the controls and provides his overview of recent W3C’s tracking protection working group machinations. He’s concerned about the implications of Do-Not-Track if implemented. Koran writes, “While normalizing the web’s approach to privacy could yield significant benefits to both consumers and businesses alike, there is an increasing risk that the standards being discussed could dramatically restrict the free flow of information that the W3C was originally intended to foster.” Read it.

Viewability Everywhere

DoubleVerify inked a deal to bring its viewability data to Kantar Media Compete’s panel-based research offering. According to MediaPost, “The agreement initially supports ‘user-level’ data and behavioral profiles, measuring reach, frequency and exposure. Then it will expand to focus more broadly.” Read it.

Feed Me Brands

Publisher yield optimization platform Maxifier announced it was going to become just a bit more brand friendly by virtue of a new partnership with Moat.  According to the release, Maxifier will take a feed of Moat data which “will allow automated campaign optimization recommendations to be generated around this data, helping publishers ensure they deliver campaigns to an advertiser’s branding metric.” Read more.

Serve Your Self

[x+1] announced a new revision of its marketing platform Origin as it looks to make it increasingly self-service for clients.... such as “Enhanced data management allows marketers to manage how data is ingested, stored and presented in Origin and used by other systems directly through the Origin UI, reducing the need for IT support.” Read more.

Twitter Flipped Off

Mike McCue, CEO of Social/mobile news reader Flipboard, discarded his seat on Twitter’s board last month, but as a shareholder he still seems to care about the microblog’s direction. In an interview with Telegraph UK’s Katherine Rushton, his message is to go slow when it comes to chasing revenues. “Twitter was created as an open platform, an open communications ecosystem, and I hope it can stay that way,” McCue says. “You have to be really careful not to let money get in the way of that.” Read more.

Infographic Thursday

Domo founder and CEO Josh James (also founder and former CEO of Omniture before it was acquired by Adobe) taps the data from a survey of over 2,000 students as he as his team try to visualize the CEOs of tomorrow on CEO.com. See it now! (FYI, James started CEO.com, too.)

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